Dynamic Balance

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Educational
2 videos
Erasers Four
There are traditionally three pillars of fitness: Strength, Flexibility, and Cardiovascular. Here at Dynamic Balance we believe in a fourth pillar: Tension Erasers, or Erasers for short. You’re probably already familiar with “shaking it out” after exercise. In addition to feeling good, there are real health benefits to this. We begin with four introductory erasers: Butterflies, Bicycles, Arm Swings and Wrap ‘n’ Slaps. They are simple, portable and valuable for everyone. Chances are you’ve done them without even thinking about it. We want to show you the best, intentional way we know how to do them.
4 videos
Foundation Five
These exercises are as safe and simple as they come. They can be done by almost anyone of any level of physical capability and in our opinion they should be done by almost everyone. They are the base on which everything else in our program is built upon. Like the foundation of a building, they are all done while lying on the ground. If you do nothing else from the Basic 21, do the Foundation Five. Through these activities alone we have seen people make significant improvement in their kinetic hygiene, alleviate pain and improve the quality of their lives.
6 videos
Mobility Five
The Mobility 5 contains classic stretches that you may already be familiar with but with added attention to detail. As with all Dynamic Balance exercises, the focus is on accuracy of motion and reinforcing foundational strength. Before you begin adding these to your routine, please take a moment to review these pointers for proper stretching. Doing anything the wrong way can cause injury.
5 videos
Standing Seven
Once you’ve become comfortable with the Foundation Five, you can begin challenging yourself further with the Standing Seven. As the name implies, they are done in a standing position, as opposed to the Foundation Five, which have all been based on the ground (just like the foundation of a building).

With all our motions, we want you to work at a level that challenges you but one in which you are able to maintain your base settings of Pelvic Tilt and Chin-to-Throat. The point where you lose control of base setting is what we call the “Point of first failure.” If you experience this too often, switch the level of intensity at which you are performing the movement and/or spend more time with the Foundation Five.
7 videos